RLW

Commentary

For some reason, this article reminded me of the strategy we used in elementary school to determine author’s purpose: P I E. P is for Persuade, I for Inform, E to entertain. I suppose even from a young age, we were being taught to look for meaning in what we were reading, and to not just read on the surface. Though many of my middle school years were spent reading to answer questions about plot points, high school English retrained me to look for meaning within the text and not just an A B C D or ‘none of the above’ bubble mark.

Key Terms & Main Ideas

The purpose of Reading Like a Writer is to examine what techniques the author used and how effective said techniques were.

  • RLW: Reading to learn about writing
  • RLW in action
    • Purpose in writing?
    • Intended audience?
    • Genre?
    • Published/student writing: how does this affect your expectations?
    • Will you be asked to write something like this?
  • Questions to ask BEFORE you read
    • Genre?
    • Published/Student-produced?
    • Will I be assigned to write this type?
  • Questions AS you read
    • Purpose?
    • Audience?

Analysis

…and by islands, I mean paragraphs by J.R. Carpenter is a webpage that appears to be a digital map with paragraphs beside each island. Some of the islands’ verbiage changes when a spectator mouses over the words and some shift when clicked on. The paragraphs tell a story, though not necessarily in a linear form. One may describe the population of an island, another the foliage and fauna. They are mostly told from a first person perspective and often include the pronoun ‘we’, indicating that there are other people along with the author on these islands. With each change in the paragraphs, a slightly new story is told: one of misery or of joy, one of a dim outlook or of hope.

Unorganized

  • What is RLW?
    • Reading to learn about writing, not necessarily content of text. How the piece was put together.
    • Writing is a series of choices: word by word, paragraph by paragraph
  • Questions to ask BEFORE you read
    • Genre?
    • Published/Student-produced?
    • Will I be assigned to write this type?
  • Questions AS you read
    • Purpose?
    • Audience?
  • What should you write as you read?
    • Technique?
      • Effective?
      • Should I use this technique?
  • RLW in action
    • Purpose in writing?
    • Intended audience?
    • Genre?
    • Published/student writing: how does this affect your expectations?
    • Will you be asked to write something like this?

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